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Treasury may require as heavy collateral security, in addition to their capital paid in, from such a corporation, as he could from an individual collector or receiver, which makes the Government deposites safer in the hands of a bank than it could be with an individual.

[FEB. 10, 1835.

That amendment is, that the deposite banks shall be selected by the Legislatures of the respective States. In regard to this, it is enough to say that, if it be adopted, any State Legislature politically opposed to any administration, or in favor of the creation of a national bank, would have it in its power greatly to embarrass the Treasury, and render the fiscal operations of Government inconvenient, expensive, and unsafe. The Legislature of any State opposed to an administration, or desirous to bring the present system of State bank agency into disrepute, and to see it fail, so that the country might be forced back upon a national institution, might select their worst banks, or those the most inconve niently situated, and which would not or could not faithfully discharge the fiscal agency intrusted to them. If the States are to select the federal agents to be employed to receive, safe keep, and disburse, the public money, upon the same principle the States should be employed to appoint the public agents who collect the public money within their limits. The officer who collects and the person who keeps and disburses the pub

It may be well questioned whether the heaviest security which the most wealthy individual could give, could make the public deposite safe at the point of large collection. In the city of New York half the revenue is collected. Several millions of public money may be in the hands of a receiver at one time; and if he be corrupt, or shall engage in speculation or trade, and meet with a reverse of fortune, the loss sustained by Government would be inevitable. With ample security, as it was supposed, the Government lost a million or more in the tea cases, a few years ago. The losses in three cases alone, as already stated, in 1827 and 1828, when it was supposed ample care had been taken to secure the debt, amounted to near two millions. As, then, between the responsibility of a public receiver and bank corporations, as banks do exist, and are likely to exist, under State authority, the latter, upon the ground of safety to the pub-lic money in any State, are equally federal agents. If lic, are to be preferred.

Banks, when they are safe, recommend themselves to the service of the Treasury for other reasons.

1. The increased facility they possess over individual collectors or receivers, in making transfers of public money to distant points for disbursement, without charge to the public. Indeed, this is a service which individuals, to the extent of our large revenues, could not perform.

2. It may happen, in the fluctuation of the amount of revenue and expenditures, that there will be at some times a considerable surplus in the treasury; which, though it may be temporary, if it be withdrawn from circulation, and placed in the strong box of a receiver, the amount of circulation will be injuriously disturbed, by hoarding the deposite, by which the value of every article of merchandise and property would be affected. So that, inasmuch as we cannot anticipate or estimate what the exact amount of revenue or expenditure may be from year to year, there may occur an excess of revenue in the treasury, not immediately called for to be disbursed, which it would be very inconvenient to abstract from trade and circulation. Whilst the deposite is in a bank, the bank may use it, keeping itself at the same time ready to pay when demanded, and it is not withdrawn from the general circulation, as so much money hoarded and withdrawn from the use of the community.

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the object of the gentleman from Georgia, who has given notice of his intention to move this amendment, leaving to the States the right to select for the Treasury the banks of deposite, be to guard against the exercise or abuse of the patronage which is supposed to attach to the power of selection, he will find, by looking to the provisions of this bill, that it effectually guards these deposite banks, when once selected, from any such influence. When they shall be once selected, they may hold the public deposite, not only independently of the Treasury, but, if you please, against the will of the executive department of the Government, so long as they continue to perform the duties and services prescribed in the bill, and stipulated by them to be performed in their contracts, and so long as the public money may be considered safe in their custody. So long as they shall continue to discharge the duties and obligations imposed on them by their undertaking, and shall keep in a safe condition, the deposites cannot be removed by the executive authority. The power to discontinue them as public depositories is reserved to Congress, and no pow. er, whilst Congress is in session, is reserved to the Executive, except to report to Congress for their action, if any of those banks have, in any respect, failed to conform to the provisions of the law, or have become, or are likely to become, in his judgment, unsafe. The executive power to discontinue exists only during the recess of Congress, and can then only be exercised for palpable violations of some one of the conditious upon which it receives the deposites, or because of alleged unsafety of the public funds; and, in that case, the facts and reasons upon which such discontinuance has taken

If in the hands of receivers, they must either hoard it, by keeping it locked up in a strong box, or use it at their own risk in private speculation or trade, or they must, for their own security, and on their own responsibility, place it at last on deposite in banks for safe keep-place are to be reported to Congress at its next session. ing, until they are called on by the Government for it.

This temporary use of the money on deposite in a bank constitutes the only compensation which the bank receives for the risk of keeping it, and for the services it performs. If receivers be employed, they can perform no other service than to keep the money, and must be paid a compensation from the Treasury.

The other provision of the amendment proposed to be offered by the gentleman from Virginia, which requires that the public revenue shall be paid "in the current coin of the United States," is unnecessary. No public creditor can now be paid in any thing but current coin by any of the deposite banks, if he demand coin. Nothing but coin, or the paper of specie-paying banks, readily convertible into specie, is now received in the payment of the public revenue.

The House has had notice of another amendment to be offered to the bill, and it is the last I shall notice.

The power to make the selection in the first instance was given to the Secretary of the Treasury, because, from the nature of his duties, he was supposed to be more competent to make them than any other officer. The selection once made, and these banks are no longer the recipients of favors which depend on the executive will, and are under no obligations other than faithfully to perform the duties required of them by law, and which they have stipulated to perform. Should this bill pass, there can be no danger that the power of se lection, which it vests in the Secretary of the Treasury, could be used as a branch of executive patronage; for the banks, when selected, would not be dependent on the Executive for the continuance of their agency. The present deposite banks would probably be continued; and, if so, it would be necessary to make but few, if any, new selections. If Congress fail to pass this, or some other bill regulating the selection and employment

INDEX TO THE DEBATES IN THE SENATE.

Adams, Mr., 10,000 copies of his oration on the life and
character of General Lafayette ordered to be
printed, 113.
Alabama; a bill authorizing that State to apply the two
per cent. fund arising from the proceeds of the
sale of lands to the purposes of education, 224;
taken up, 615; and laid on the table, 616.
Alabama resolutions in favor of expunging a part of the
Senate Journal, 253.
Amendment of the constitution; a resolution proposing to
amend it in relation to the election of President
and Vice President, 216.

providing that a majority of the members of both
Houses shall pass a bill that has been vetoed by
the President, 540.

American consul at London, his claims allowed, 219.
Appropriations; the bill making appropriations for the
navy, 392; passed.

the bill making appropriations for fortifications
considered, 594.

for civil and diplomatic expenditures of the Gov-
ernment, 690; passed, 715.

The bill being amended by the House of Repre-
sentatives, the Senate refused to agree to one
of its amendments, after a conference had
taken place; the House refusing to recede, and
the Senate to accede, the bill was lost.
for Indian department, a bill for 1835, 239; passed.
Arkansas; a bill making appropriations for the comple-
tion of certain roads in Arkansas, 339; passed.
Army appropriations; a bill making appropriations for
1835, 239; passed.

Baird, David, a bill for the relief of, 242; passed, 576.
Baldwin, Loami, a bill for his relief, 151; laid on the
table.

Bank of the United States; a resolution calling for any
correspondence between the Secretary of the
Treasury and the bank respecting branch
drafts, 6.

Bank charters, District of Columbia, amendments propo-
sed to them when the bills shall be taken up,160.
Barracks at New Orleans, a bill making appropriation
for their repair and completion, 78; passed.
Bond, Colonel William, a bill for the relief of, 243;
passed.

Bond, Lucy; a bill for allowing interest on certain claims
to the heirs of Lucy Bond, 262; passed, 287.
Brown, O. B., his charges of unfairness against the
Post Office Committee, &c., 690.

Bulfinch, Thomas, a bill for his relief, 278.
Carey & Lea's History of Congress, a resolution autho-
rizing the purchase of 500 copies, 414; laid on
the table, 415.

Catlett, Charles J., a bill for the relief of, 536; rejected.
Chaplain, Rev. Mr. Hatch elected, 14.

Cherokee Indians, the petition of John Ross, a principal
chief, 237; referred.

Chesapeake and Ohio canal; a bill making further ap-
propriations in aid of said canal laid on the
table, 729.

Civil list, appropriations for, (See appropriations.)
Coleman, Nicholas D., a bill for the relief of, 236; re-
jected.

Columbia, District of; a bill to authorize the adoption of
the penal code prepared for the District, 456;
laid on the table, 457.

VOL. XI.-1

Columbia, District of, a bill for the relief of the cities
of Washington, Georgetown, and Alexandria,
614; passed, 619.

Cowpens, a resolution authorizing a gold medal to be
made in honor of the battle of the, 278.
Committee on Finance discharged from the further con-
sideration of several subjects, 721.
Constitution, a proposition for its amendment, (See
amendment.)

Consul, American, at London, (See American.)
Convention between the United States and Spain, a bill
to carry the same into effect, 714; bill passed.
Croghan, Colonel, a resolution for presenting to him a
gold medal for his gallantry in defending Fort
Stephenson, 236; passed.

Cumberland road, a bill for continuing and repairing
the road, 399.

Cumberland river, a resolution proposing an appropria-
tion for its improvement, 595.
Custom-house officers, a bill fixing the number and sala-
ries of, 393; passed, 417.

Cutts, Thomas, report on his memorial, 82.
Davis, Warren R., a representative from South Car-
olina, his death announced, 274.
Delaware breakwater, a bill making appropriations for
that work, and for certain harbors, 715; passed.
Duties, a bill to exempt certain merchandise from, 83.
a resolution directing the Secretary of the Treas-
ury to report at the next session of Congress
the amount of duties paid on plains, kerseys, and
Kendal cottons imported, which were ordered
after the passage of the act of 1832, and before
the passage of the act of 1833, 273.

a bill authorizing a remission of, on railroad cars,
&c., 413; laid on the table.

a bill to suspend the operation of certain por-
tions of the act of 1832, 539; passed.
Easton, W. C., a bill for the relief of, 234; ordered to
lie on the table.

Executive patronage, resolution for appointing a com
mittee to consider the expediency of redu-
Icing it, 109; agreed to, and the committee
elected by ballot; report of committee, 361.

a bill to repeal the first and second sections of
the act to limit the terms of certain civil offi-
cers, passed in 1820, 418; ordered to be en-
grossed, 491; passed, 576.

Expunging resolution offered, 510; taken up, 631; laid
on the table; a motion was again made to take
it up, 715, and lost; taken up, 723; and, after
being amended, was laid on the table, 727.
in a new form submitted, to be taken up in the
second week of next session, 728.

Foreign Powers, a resolution authorizing the sale of the
lion and horses presented to the U. States con-
sul at Tangiers by the Emperor of Morocco,35.
Foreign Relations, the Committee on, made a report on
the message of the President on the 25th of
February, which was laid on the table and or-
dered to be printed, 722.

Fortifications, resolution respecting fortifying the Pa-
tuxent, 45; agreed to, 47.

resolution instructing the Committee on Military
Affairs to inquire into the expediency of in-
creasing the appropriation for arming the
fortifications, 273.

Fortifications, bill making appropriations for, (See ap-
propriations.)

France; resolution calling on the President for the in-
structions which had been given to our minis-
ters in France since July 4, 1831, 45.
report from the Committee on Foreign Relations
in reference to the President's message on the
subject of the stipulated indemnity, 104.
three memorials from Massachusetts in reference
to our present relations with France, 571; or-
dered to lie on the table, 576.
Frauds in the sale of public lands, a report on the sub-
ject referred to the President of the United
States, 727.

French spoliations, a bill reported to provide satisfaction
for claims prior to 1800, 6.

Lighthouse at Mobile point, a bill making appropriation
for it, 361; passed.
Loomis, Walter; a bill for the relief of Walter Loomis
and Abel Gay, 239; laid on the table.
Lyme Creek and Chattahoochie road, (See road.)
Mail route in Mississippi, a report from the Post Office
Department on it, 80.

McCord, David, a bill for the relief of, 241; passed.
Mint, a bill for establishing branches thereof, 551; pass-
ed, 613.

Mississippi, a bill for the removal of a bar in, 237; passed.
Navy appropriations, (See appropriations.)

a bill to regulate the pay of, considered, 716.
North Carolina resolutions instructing their Senator how
to vote on the expunging resolution, 722.
Oaths to be administered by receivers and registers of
public lands, (See lands.)

Offences against the United States; a bill to amend the
acts for the punishment of such offences, 535;
passed.

French relations, copies of the correspondence which
had taken place between Mr. Livingston, Mr.
Forsyth, and Mr. Serurier, communicated by
the President of the United States, 621.
Gales & Seaton's Register of Debates complained of by Ohio
Mr. Benton, 33.

resolution directing the new Senators to be sup-
plied with them taken up and laid on the table,
278; taken up, debated, and laid on the table,

701.
General Post Office, (See Post Office.)
Goodwin, Wilkinson, a bill reported for the relief of,

241.

History of Congress, (See Carey & Lea.)
Hudry, John, a bill for the relief of, 235; passed.
Jouett, Robert, a bill for the relief of his representa-
tives, 440; passed.

Indian department appropriations, (See appropriations.)
Indian tribes and the United States; two resolutions, the

first directing the Judiciary to inquire into the
expediency of making further provision to ena-
ble Indian tribes to defend and maintain their
rights to their lands in the courts of the United
States; the second directing the Committee on
Indian Affairs to inquire into the expediency
of making further provision for setting apart a
district of country, west of the Mississippi, for
such of the Cherokees as may choose to emi-
grate, and for securing their peaceful enjoy-
ment thereof, 289; referred.

Judicial circuits, a resolution to arrange the circuit
courts so as to annex the 4th to the 3d circuit,
and to extend the circuit system to all the
States, 287.

a bill to carry the same into effect, 584; com-
mitted, 594.

Lafayette, General; report of the committee appointed
at the last session, fixing the day, &c., on
which Mr. Adams would deliver an oration on
the life and character of the General, 44.
Lands, Public, the present Committee on, continued, 4.
resolution calling for a list of the purchasers of,
4, 5.

a bill proposed to appropriate, for a limited time,
the proceeds of the sale of, 15.

a bill reported to authorize receivers and registers
to administer oaths, 78.

claims, a bill providing for settlement of, 79;
passed.

maps of, a resolution directing the Secretary of
the Senate to have made, 81; agreed to, 108.
a bill for graduating the price of, 238; postponed.
Laurens, Colonel John, a bill supplementary to the act
for his relief, 417; passed.

Lawrence, R., case of, in relation to an attempt on the
life of the President, 714.

Leavensworth & Bloomington and other railroad compa-
nies, bills taken up and passed, 621.
Leitensdorfer, Colonel, a bill for his relief, 70; passed.

boundary line; a bill to establish the northern
boundary line, 109; passed, 117.
abolition memorials, 398.

resolutions in reference to the Bank of the Uni-
ted States, 630.

Order, points of, 427, 428, 432.
Oration on General Lafayette, (See Mr. Adams.)
Paintings; a resolution proposing to purchase certain
paintings for the President's mansion, 277.
Pensions; a bill to continue the office of Commissioner
of Pensions, 216.

Pension agency in North Alabama; a report on a resolu-
tion directing an inquiry into the expediency
of establishing such an agency, 399.
Poindexter, Honorable George, a letter from him to the
President of the Senate, complaining of a
criminal charge against him contained in a let
ter in the public papers, purporting to be from
New York, 582, referred to a committee, 583;
report on the subject, 628.

Polish

report on the case of R. Lawrence, (See Law-
rence, R.)

exiles, a bill to amend the bill of last session ma-
king them a grant of land, 439; laid on the

table.

Post Office and Post Roads, present Committee on, con-
tinued, 2.

report made on the subject, 244.

bill for reorganizing the Post Office establish-
ment, 309, passed, 392.

resolution on the subject of the debts of, 413.
resolutions providing payment of extra expenses,
620; passed.

Potomac bridge, a bill to amend the act authorizing the
construction of a bridge over the Potomac, 278.
President's annual message received, 3.

message accompanying a copy of the declaration
of independence, engraved on copper, be
queathed by the late Marquis Lafayette, 5.
message, with copies of his condolence to the
family of Lafayette, and the reply of G. W.
Lafayette, 8.

message in answer to a call for instructions given

to ministers in France, 77.
Printer, election of, 693; Gales & Seaton elected, 698.
Private claims, a resolution proposing to classify them,

&c., 595.

Public deposites, a bill to regulate them, 620; passed,

660.

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Railroad cars, remission of duties on, (See duties.)
Revenue, a series of resolutions calling on the President
to furnish, at the next session, detailed infor-
mation of the amount received from various
sources, 455.

Road from Lyme creek to Chattahoochie, a bill making
appropriation for, 219; laid on the table.
Ruggles, John, from Maine, appeared as Senator in the
place of Peleg Sprague, resigned, 621.
Secretary of the Treasury's annual report, 4.
Senators, a list of, 1.

Senate printing; a resolution directing the Secretary of
the Senate to inquire into the state of the
printing ordered during the last and present
sessions, and report, 277..

Shepherd, Moses, a bill for the relief of the representa-
tives of, 224; passed.

Singleton, Wyatt, a bill for the relief of, 241; laid on
the table.

Standing committees appointed, 6.

Tyler, Nathaniel, a bill for the relief of, 239; laid on the
table.

Tyler, Mr., (Virginia,) elected President pro tempore
for the remainder of the session, 728.
his address to the Senate, 728.

United States and Indian tribes, (See Indian tribes.)
Virginia military land warrants, bill granting an additional
quantity of land to satisfy them, 689; passed.
Wabash, a resolution proposing an appropriation for the
improvement of the river, 9; agreed to, 14.
a resolution on the expediency of establishing a
port of entry on ditto, 67; agreed to, 70.

a bill for the improvement of the Wabash, 83;
passed.

a resolution calling on the Secretary of War for
an estimate of the cost of constructing a bridge
over the river, 223.

White, Joseph, a bill for the relief of, 234; passed.
Yeas and nays on the bill exempting certain merchandise
from duties, 83.

on the bill for improving the Wabash river, 89.
on the the passage of the bill, 114.

on printing 20,000 copies of the report on our
relations with France, 108.

on the resolution declaring it inexpedient to adopt
any legislative measures in regard to our affairs
with France, 215.

Yeas and nays on the bill for the relief of Moses Shep-
herd, 224, 234.

on laying on the table a motion to print the Ala-
bama resolutions in favor of expunging a part
of the Senate Journal, 268.

on the motion to print 20,000 copies of the re-
ports on the Post Office, with the documents,
272.

on engrossing the bill making indemnity for
French spoliations prior to 1800, 272.
on the passage of the bill for ditto, 282.
on the bill in favor of the heirs of Lucy Bond,
287.

on the Post Office bill, 360.

on printing 10,000 copies of a report on execu.
tive patronage, 392.

on the Cumberland road bill, 413.

on the bill supplementary to the act for the relief
of Colonel John Laurens, 417.

on the bill for the relief of the representatives of
Robert Jouett, 440.

on engrossing the bill for repealing the first and
second sections of the act to limit the terms of
service of certain civil officers, passed in 1820,

491.

on an amendment to ditto, 571.
on the passage of the bill, 576.
on engrossing the bill for the relief of Polish
exiles, 513.

on the bill for establishing branches of the mint,
580, 581, 613.

on the bill supplementary to the act to amend the
judicial system, 614.

on the bill to regulate the public deposites, 629,
630, 660.

on the bill granting additional land for Virginia
warrants, 690.

on the general appropriation bill, 713, 714.
on the report on the case of R. Lawrence,
714.
715.

on a motion to take up the expunging resolution,

on an amendment to the Delaware breakwater
bill, 716.

on the expunging resolution, 723, 726, 727.
on the disagreeing votes of the two Houses on the
appropriation bill, 738, 744.

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Benton, Mr., Missouri, on furnishing Senators with the | Clay, Mr., Kentucky, on call on the President for the

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our relations with France, 108.

Ohio boundary line, 115, 117.
French spoliations, 118, 179.

gold medal to Colonel Croghan, 236.

Post Office bill, 310, 319, 344, 353, 358, 359.
bill respecting custom-house officers, 398.
executive patronage, 428, 447, 537.

the judicial system, 589.

bill for the relief of the cities of Washington,
Georgetown, and Alexandria, 615, 619.
general appropriation bill, 706.

Black, Mr., Mississippi, on a mail route in Mississippi,

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80, 81.

establishing branches of the mint, 599, 606, 611.
bill for the relief of the cities of Washington,
Georgetown, and Alexandria, 615.

general appropriation bill, 713.

Brown, Mr., North Carolina, on the expunging resolu-
tion, 511.

establishing branches of the mint, 576, 577, 604.
expunging resolution, 723.

Buchanan, Mr., Pennsylvania, on the exemption of mer-
chandise from duties, 92.

our relations with France, 206, 213.
the amendment to the constitution, 217.
presents from Morocco, 218.
Alabama two per cent. fund, 231.
Post Office bill, 343, 358.

bill respecting custom-house officers, 398.
Cumberland road bill, 400, 405, 411.
executive patronage, 455, 495, 571.
meinorials on our relations with France, 576.
the judicial system of the United States, 591.
bill for the relief of Washington, Georgetown,
and Alexandria, 618.

bill to regulate the public deposites, 621, 629.
furnishing Senators with the Register of Debates,
700, 701.
general appropriation bill, 703.
disagreeing votes between the two Houses on the
appropriation bill, 734.

Calhoun, Mr., South Carolina, on our relations with
France, 106, 212.

executive patronage, 109, 361, 389, 417, 418,
423, 427, 432, 553, 570, 571.
Ohio boundary line, 115.

Post Office reports, 245, 248, 249, 250, 269.
Alabama resolutions, 263, 264, 266, 267.
announces the death of Warren R. Davis, 274.
notices an objectionable publication in the Globe
newspaper, 275.

Post Office bill, 350.
custom-house officers, 415.

establishing branches of the mint, 551, 552, 605,
606, 607, 609, 612, 613.

bill for the relief of Washington, Georgetown,
and Alexandria, 618.
bill to regulate the public deposites, 620, 621.
general appropriation bill, 707, 709, 710, 712.
expunging resolution, 722.

disagreeing votes of the two Houses on the
appropriation bill, 731, 735.

Clay, Mr., Kentucky, on the bill to appropriate the pro-
ceeds of the public lands, 15.

presents from foreign Powers, 35, 218.
report in relation to an oration to be delivered

on the life and character of General Lafayette,

44.

instructions given to our ministers in France,

45.

report on our French relations, 104, 105, 106,
199, 200, 213.

printing the oration of Mr. Adams on the life and
character of General Lafayette, 113.
improvement of the Wabash river, 114.
bill for the relief of Nicholas D. Coleman, 236.
graduating the price of public lands, 238.
claim of Nathaniel Tyler, 239.

Post Office report, 245.

Alabama resolutions, 253, 255, 257, 264.
United States and Indian tribes, 289, 306.
Post Office bill, 316.

Cumberland road bill, 409, 412.

executive patronage, 454, 455, 513, 570.
election of public printer, 492, 494, 495.

a proposition for amending the constitution so
that a majority of both Houses may pass a ve-
toed bill, 551.

establishing branches of the mint, 552, 576, 580,
581, 599, 602, 607, 611, 612, 613.
an anonymous letter to the Honorable George
Poindexter, 582.

the judicial system, 592, 594.

Alabama two per cent. fund, 615.

bill for the relief of Washington, Georgetown,
and Alexandria, 618.

bill granting additional land for Virginia land
warrants, 689.

election of printer, 693.

general appropriation bill, 701, 705, 711, 713.
bill for carrying into effect the convention be-
tween the United States and Spain, 714.
report from the Committee on Foreign Relations,

722.

disagreeing votes between the two Houses on the
appropriation bill, 730, 733.

Clayton, Mr., Delaware, on the claim of Thomas Cutts,

Ohio boundary line, 109, 115, 116.

our relations with France, 213.

82.

graduating the price of public lands, 238.
bill for the relief of David Baird, 242, 243, 512.
Post Office reports, 245, 269.

Alabama resolutions, 264.

executive patronage, 503, 537, 538, 571.
bill for the relief of Charles J. Catlett, 535.
judicial system, 614.

O. B. Brown and Post Office Committee, 692.
general appropriation bill, 702, 704, 707.
expunging resolution, 723.

Cuthbert, Mr., Georgia, on our relations with France,

Ewing,

208, 212.

Post Office report, 250, 251, 253.
United States and Indian tribes, 300, 308.
executive patronage, 427, 429, 432, 538, 539,
570.

establishing branches of the mint, 609.
disagreeing votes between the two Houses on the
appropriation bill, 737.

Mr., Ohio, on our relations with France, 106,

107.

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